The Grit turns 30 000

Posted: June 18, 2014 by J in General

It’s nice to have a birthday isn’t it. For a blog, I reckon the most natural milestone to mark is the hit count.

Yesterday The Grit in the Oyster reached 30 000 visits.

They’re the ones we can log, anyhow.

So Happy Birthday to The Grit, and a big thankyou to everyone who’s joined us for the ride. We’re stoked that all those thousands of people have tuned in.

We’ve covered some interesting and risky territory this past 10 000. The Lord’s Supper, Hell, Calvinism, Katoomba Convention and John Dickson, Justification, and much more.

Our most popular post in the past year, by a country mile, and also the most commented on, was

The-deep-structure-of-calvinism

and its sequel

The Deep Structure of Calvinism 2

These generated comment at various places around facebook, as well as here at The Grit.

Our ambitions for The Grit are that we manage to keep questioning everything, refusing to swallow traditional doctrines and ideas uncritically. That we provide an intellectual irritant to help keep evangelical brains from fossilizing.

Also we’d love to see our readers gain the courage to comment more at The Grit. Often people email us comments, obviously they prefer privacy. But wouldn’t it be great if more people felt able to share their views in a public arena? Enriching for everyone.

Well, here’s hoping you’ll all be with us at 40 000!

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Comments
  1. jeltzz says:

    People don’t comment because, for the most part, commenting on blogs died about 7 years ago.

  2. J says:

    You’re right, jeltzz!
    However, I’m not sure if that’s really a ‘because’…
    What do you think the reasons are?

    At the Grit we don’t like to accept things the way they are. It’s a character flaw no doubt…
    🙂

    Oh, and thanks for commenting!

    • jeltzz says:

      There was a sociological shift in the way users on the internet interacted with blogs, as well as a corresponding increase in the number of bloggers, that moved blogging from a relatively smaller community that engaged with each other, to a more ‘publish’ medium, while discussion of topics moved of into other interfaces.

  3. dan says:

    Congrats Jono

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